Babel

Oil on canvas
180x160cm
2024

IMG_9540 webversion

IMG_9438 copy

IMG_9439 copy

IMG_9443 copy

IMG_9441 copy

IMG_9442 copy

IMG_9440 copy

IMG_9437 copy


Previous
Next

Heap

Oil on canvas
180x160cm
2024

IMG_9349 webversion

IMG_9356 webversion

IMG_9164 copy

IMG_9165 copy

IMG_9166 copy

IMG_9167 copy

IMG_9168 copy

IMG_9169 copy

IMG_9170 copy


Previous
Next

Debris

Oil on canvas
190x130cm

The second in a new series of ‘heap’ paintings based off of collages made from the discarded pieces of paper that are left after I have cut out the interesting figures and objects I use for my usual collages. I have been piling the scraps up into heaps to symbolise a weightiness. For me the act of using waste to create is poignant in the midst of a climate crisis, but the forms that are made have an emotional, less rational feel to them as well. Whether that be a visualisation of “emotional baggage” or the feeling of being trapped by your possessions. The pile also speaks of wreckage, decay, archaeology and architecture. 


Rubble

Oil on canvas
190x130cm

IMG_9363 webversion

IMG_8221

IMG_8222

IMG_8223

IMG_8224

IMG_8225

IMG_8226

IMG_8227

IMG_8228

IMG_8229

IMG_8230

IMG_8231

IMG_8232

IMG_8233

IMG_8234

IMG_8235

IMG_8236


Previous
Next

Painted from a collage made of scraps and offcuts leftover after making other collages: this painting depicts a pile of abstracted forms and glimpses of figuration. Arranged as if the elements in my earlier collage paintings had collapsed into a heap, this painting symbolises the aftermath of a society bombarded with imagery via advertising, social media and 24hr news cycles. The image has been cheapened via saturation in the 21st century, what does this mean for painters? How do we compete in such a world? What does it mean to add yet more images into such a storm? Fatigued with imagery, I have naturally found myself painting a heap of discarded shards. This is the first in a new series I’ve started work on. The pile for me is a poignant symbol, one that naturally forms with neglect, a way of sorting mess, and one that describes humanities excess of production and waste. In a world filled with trash leftover from the last 100 years of “progress” my generation and those that follow are left with the burden of sorting through the mess, extracting the useful ideas and sound ideologies for recycling and finding a way to safety dispose of the toxic ones. The heap describes other burdens too: perhaps emotional baggage or psychological weight? As usual, the image formed first and these thoughts after, this reflection on this topic and the stimulating techniques that can be used to paint so many varying textures and languages has driven me to make more and so I have decided to paint a ‘heap’ series.


Divine Masculine Divine Feminine – Triptych

Oil, acrylic, calico and collage on canvas
190x480cm (full) 190x160cm (individually)

Can also be displayed as a diptych, titled Gang Stalkers as shown below:



IMG_7609

IMG_7610

IMG_7611

IMG_7612

IMG_7613

IMG_7614

IMG_7615

IMG_7616

IMG_7617

IMG_7618

IMG_7619

IMG_7620

IMG_7621

IMG_7622

IMG_7623

IMG_7624

IMG_7625

IMG_7626

IMG_7627

IMG_7628

IMG_7629

IMG_7630

IMG_7631

IMG_7632

IMG_7633

IMG_7634

IMG_7635

IMG_7636

IMG_7637

IMG_7638

IMG_7639

IMG_7640

IMG_7641

IMG_7642

IMG_7643

IMG_7644

IMG_7645

IMG_7646

IMG_7647

IMG_7648

IMG_7649

IMG_7650

IMG_7651

IMG_7652

IMG_7653


Previous
Next

A spiritual sister to my earlier triptych “Relief”.
Started at the beginning of lockdown and put on hold due to the impracticality of its size and the loss of access to a studio, the work was completed between October 2022 and January 2023.
The canvas has been built up with collage and elements painted from second hand imagery selected for its blatant consumerist propaganda. The aspirational is paired with images of violence and perversion, with the intention of questioning the capitalist system, gender roles under patriarchy and the destruction of the environment. An apocalyptic feeling pervades the work, a reflection of the feeling amongst young people today when faced with the prospect of the future. The imagery bombards the viewer the way we are now bombarded with imagery via social media, the internet and advertising. The visual language constantly changes across the piece, echoing the disparate formats of imagery we are faced with every day. The work explores themes of masculinity and femininity; aspects created socially and present physiologically. It explores psychoanalytic ideas of gender, the phallus and the sex/death drive as well as Batailles’ theories of limit experiences and eroticism. It is a personal exploration of my psyche and my interactions with and understanding of men and women in my life.


Relief – Triptych

Oil, acrylic, calico and collage on canvas
190x480cm (full) 190x160cm (individually)

Individual Titles (left to right):

Relational Entanglement

Post-Mortem

As Above, So Below

IMG_0537

IMG_4026

IMG_4018

IMG_4017

IMG_4016

IMG_4015

IMG_4014

IMG_4013

IMG_4012

IMG_4011

IMG_4010

IMG_4008

IMG_4007

IMG_4004

IMG_4003

IMG_4002

IMG_4001

IMG_3998

IMG_3997

IMG_3996

IMG_3992

IMG_3990

IMG_3989

IMG_3987

IMG_3986

IMG_3985

IMG_3984

IMG_3983

IMG_3982

IMG_3976


Previous
Next

This is the first oil painting I have made with this process, a process of not planning, but cutting out shapes of painted calico and gluing them onto the canvas, then gluing paper on top, then painting individual figures or scenes one by one as I came across them in my box of collage clippings. The spontaneity of this process helped me avoid the preplanning that often lead to a composition of horizontals and verticals that felt quite awkward, prior to this I had been making collages with this process but not paintings, and there was a disconnect between the two that needed addressing.

The imagery makes subtle references to issues I think about a lot and interested in such as anxieties of modern living, the impact of technology, psychoanalysis and layers of consciousness, how governments deal with crises like health scares (this was prior to covid19), death, religion, the paranormal, violence, conspiracy theories. There is a lot of ideas going on in it, as there is lots of thoughts and interests going on in my mind and I think this reflects how my generation feels: bombarded with information, all very dramatic and all contradicting each other.

My research into conspiracy theories form a large source of inspiration for this work, however there are bigger messages being put across in this work and if there was one overarching theme it would be the influence of the internet. For most young people and many older people, it is the main source of information, but a place that is at war with itself constantly and is full of false information that masquerades as the truth. Websites also rely on clicks to get revenue, so the internet is full of dramatic and intense content, sexual, violent and inflammatory. This kind of imagery fills your head when you spend enough time on the internet and the paintings kind of illustrate that.

I am always acutely aware that painting is an ancient medium and I often wonder its relevance in a digital society and question why I still paint, so subverting the traditions of painting (whether formally or via the imagery I depict) is a way for me to explore that.

This piece also explores space and depth. Another conversation about the relevance of painting was the Greenbergian argument for abstraction to embrace the flatness of painting and do away with illusionistic depth. I was very interested in the Jasper Johns Bathtub series of paintings of a real 3d space, but seen with a head-on view of a flat wall with flat posters on it and then right in the middle an illusionistic nail protruding from the wall with a shadow, he was playing both games, flatness and depth. This painting collages areas of depth and areas of flatness, they overlap and intersect in ways that doesn’t make sense in a consistent way, there is a mix of different spaces. This is where the name Relief comes from, it’s partly a comment on relief sculpture, which is both three dimensional and flat, and partly a sarcastic use of a word that is opposite to the feeling we experienced when faced with any of the topics in the painting.


Chapel of Rest

Oil and acrylic on canvas
150x100cm

IMG_2922

IMG_2923

IMG_2935

IMG_2934

IMG_2933

IMG_2932

IMG_2931

IMG_2930

IMG_2929

IMG_2927

IMG_2926

IMG_2924


Previous
Next

Continuing with a common motif of mine: the picture-in-picture effect, this painting features an image that is interlaid with two ‘windows’ offering different images to the main image that fills the majority of the canvas. The painting was inspired initially by Victorian era Christmas cards depicting dead birds, sent to loved ones with a sense of dark humour. The dark humour was continued in the choice of imagery used: in most cases, it would make sense to overlay something as tragic and sullen as a ravaged battlefield with something offering more hope, however in this case I decided to overlay it with images of yet more melancholy. The painting doesn’t just exist as a source of humour however, as it is painted with sensitivity and aims to be absorbed on multiple levels. The industrial slaughter of young men during the First World War marked a shift in the way global power operated and it’s use of modern technology. The Victorians were morbid people and noted for their contribution to the gothic genre, and the First World War left a shadow over generations of artists that lived through it, creating swathes of artwork that grappled with death and destruction.


Baldur & the Sword

Oil and acrylic on canvas
150x100cm

IMG_2916

IMG_2918

IMG_2917

IMG_2912

IMG_2914

IMG_2913

IMG_2915

IMG_2919

IMG_2920


Previous
Next

A painting of an English Bull Terrier named Baldur, a real dog belonging to a good friend who is seen here grasping a mythical sword with his mouth. The painting is based on a photo of him biting a plastic toy sword, with the sword being sized up and replaced with a real one in the painting process. The image was chosen for its striking quality, the initial reaction to it being concern for the dog, with the knowledge that a sword is very sharp and a dog’s mouth very soft. The image was also chosen for its seemingly symbolic qualities. It resembles the kind of image seen in medieval art, in the illustrations of alchemy books, or perhaps the cryptic symbols of the Freemasons. The piece sits among a series of paintings exploring the gothic genre, and its relevance in the contemporary world. The feeling is that this image could be an archetype, representing something much larger and perhaps quite mystical. To some however, this painting might not function as a mysterious, elevated concept, but can simply be enjoyed as a playful celebration of the high fantasy genre, and both reactions are equally valid.


Searching

Quadriptych
Oil on canvas-wrapped boards
Individual sizes: Height 328mm x Width 353mm

IMG_6215

IMG_6217

IMG_6216

IMG_6218

IMG_6220

IMG_6219

IMG_6223

IMG_6222

IMG_6221

IMG_6225

IMG_6224

IMG_6229

IMG_6227

IMG_6226


Previous
Next

Burial

Oil on canvas
180x160cm

IMG_5778

IMG_5779

IMG_5777

IMG_5776

IMG_5786

IMG_5781

IMG_5785

IMG_5784

IMG_5783

IMG_5782

IMG_5780


Previous
Next

Utopia

Oil on canvas
101.5×50.5cm

Another in my series of green paintings. Similar to “Evil Lurks” this one also features a landscape invented by collaging images of separate locations. However in this painting the torn edges of the paper collage pieces and the joins between them are included, providing what looks like cracks in the otherwise idyllic scene. There is a continuation between each image which presents as one landscape but the jumping in colour and shape leaves the scene disjointed and fractured. A theme that can be read into this piece is that of the climate crisis, history’s biggest threat to the utopian ideals of nature. The cracks appearing in the landscape insinuating the beginning of a collapse. But the idea that remained with me whilst making the piece was of the dark underside of nature which is omnipresent and inseparable from the utopian aspects of nature. The idea of evil and good as two sides of the same coin, the balance of chaos and order, light and dark and other readings of duality in philosophy and religion. The idea that nature contains an element of evil in its beauty is part of gothic and romantic fiction and art, a core theme of all my explorations.

IMG_4867

IMG_4866

IMG_4865

IMG_4864

IMG_4863

IMG_4862

IMG_4861

IMG_4859


Previous
Next

Evil Lurks

Oil, acrylic, paint pen and spray paint on canvas.

Another painting in the greenery series. The motif painted ontop of the landscape resembles patterns more often seen in tattooing, a kind of contemporary reworking of the 90s (now infamous) tribal designs (for want of a better term), which has come to be known as “cybersigilism”, a visual style that has really taken off in tattooing the past few years. But it is also inspired by the towers and details on gothic churches, the angular and sharp shapes on the buildings and armour of the evil characters in Lord of the Rings, and the concrete spikes used to demarcate areas where radioactive waste is buried: the attempt of architects to use a visual language of evil and danger to warn potential intelligent life thousands of years in the future to steer clear. I’m interested in how these sharp and angular curves are read as malicious and non-human across many cultures and throughout history. I felt that laying this visual over a landscape would imply a mysterious evil within an otherwise twee and idyllic depiction of nature. The landscape is by default non-descript as it was painted from a collage of different landscapes from all over the world, but seems to lend itself to the rugged beauty of Scandanavian landscapes, invoking the strange pagan practices that continue in some regions to this day, originally condemned as black magic and satanic by the church.

IMG_3653

IMG_3652

IMG_3651

IMG_3650

IMG_3649


Previous
Next

Mythical Creatures

Oil on canvas

Mythical creatures, cryptids, medieval monsters and other characters from folklore around the world populate this mischievous forest scene. Poking out of the undergrowth, sitting in trees and looking for their next gormless victim. Part of my larger exploration of the gothic throughout history.

IMG_3412

IMG_3413

IMG_3414

IMG_3415

IMG_3416

IMG_3417

IMG_3420

IMG_3419

IMG_3418


Previous
Next

Huldufólk

Oil on canvas

Puca’s, Elves, Huldufólk and Sprites hiding in the woods. A little painting in a short series influenced by the relationship between folklore, magic and nature in various different cultures.

IMG_3224

IMG_3220

IMG_3222

IMG_3218

IMG_3223

IMG_3221


Previous
Next

Oil Study from Collage

Oil on canvas
50x40cm


The Big Theatre

Oil on canvas
100x100cm

Combining sources as diverse as traditional japanese theatre costume, photojournalism from Africa, NASA’s Orion spacecraft and emerging health technology’s the artist continues the theme of using juxtaposition to crash ideas and narratives from all different corners of our species and urges the viewer to question what these images have in common and why the artist would choose to combine them. With no specific narrative in mind, the images act as symbols or archetypes that represent all the different sociopolitcal topics that bombard the public daily via various media. 

IMG_2193

IMG_2192

IMG_2194

IMG_2191


Previous
Next

Oil and Collage Study

Oil and collage on canvas
40x50cm

IMG_0889

IMG_0890

IMG_0891

IMG_0892

IMG_0893

IMG_0894

IMG_0895

IMG_0896

IMG_0897

IMG_0898


Previous
Next

Marxist Millionaires

Oil on Canvas
60x100cm

IMG_4318

IMG_4319

IMG_4320

IMG_4321

IMG_4322

IMG_4323

IMG_4324

IMG_4325

IMG_4326


Previous
Next

The title comes from a Sunday Times Magazine from the 80’s that I found and was cutting up for collage material and it had a story about the business men in the Chinese Communist Party government who were beginning to embrace consumer capitalism but in a way that would allow China to compete with the rest of the world but not in a way that lost the government any control, I liked the phrase as a wry oxymoron. The figure in the middle is also painted from a photograph in the article.

This piece had to be done in two sessions as the first stage of painting the black and white background was done with lots of oil, then blurred with a dry brush and then had to be left to dry before I could paint the coloured sections on top. It is about using the visual qualities of other, more modern, formats in painting. This painting is made with the same materials as a renaissance painting, but it couldn’t exist before the invention of the camera. This is another instance of subverting the traditions of oil painting via not just content but formal qualities too.

This painting is also another attempt at achieving this idea of a window in the painting, a rectangular hole in the middle of a consistent background image. Something so inorganic as a rectangle cutting through the surface of the painting, this talks about flatness, which is something I am also preoccupied with.

A hole in the surface of an image of a space interrupts the illusion of depth, making it flat, but as it is a hole, it suggests there is something behind, so creates another sense of depth, the image behind, but of course this is also an illusion. Interrupting an illusion with an illusion is interesting to me conceptually as it makes me think of tricks politicians play when they seemingly fix one issue by replacing it with another.


Missing

Oil on Canvas
60x60cm

IMG_4268

IMG_4269

IMG_4270

IMG_4271

IMG_4272

IMG_4273

IMG_4276

IMG_4278


Previous
Next

This painting was made from a corrupted digital image file, I was interested to see what this would look like in paint. This is a continuation of my thinking about the subversion of oil painting via modern technology. There is a difference between this work and a collage painting like Marxist Millionaires and that is the element of time. The collage paintings are built up in layers and take multiple days to complete, Marxist Millionaires had to be done in two stages. This painting was done in one go and took maybe an hour or two, it was very quick. The time element plays into what the paintings look like. The speed and the looseness and the composition are all connected to time.


VHS Crowd

Oil on Canvas
60x60cm

IMG_4360

IMG_4362

IMG_4363

IMG_4364

IMG_4365

IMG_4366

IMG_4367

IMG_4368

IMG_4371

This is painting is another that talks about the influence of modern technology on the formal qualities of painting. This is a still from some grainy, very blurry footage of a crowd in a stadium, although I can’t be sure whether it’s a TV camera that uses film or a fan’s personal VHS camcorder, the effect is the same. A ‘poor image’ 1 that owes its colours, textures and therefore it’s atmosphere and mystery to the technology that recorded it. When this is converted into paint, more things happen, the context is taken away and these accidental formal qualities (qualities often seen as negative and actively avoided by camera makers) become artistic decisions and are bestowed with more meaning. The softness of the image also lends itself to oil paint very well.

1. In Defense of the Poor Image – Hito Steyerl


Post No Bills

Oil on Canvas
60x100cm

IMG_4304

IMG_4313

IMG_4314

IMG_4315

IMG_4380

IMG_4381

IMG_4383

IMG_4386

IMG_4503

IMG_4504


Previous
Next

Post No Bills was a return to the process of painting I used in Relief but trying to achieve it on a smaller scale and without pasting anything to the canvas. I wanted to unbalance the grid again, recapture the flowing movement between the elements. The background was the first I have painted in this way, one that aims to be organic and non-geometric, it was influenced by Clifford Still and Willem De Kooning. I wanted to bring in the device I discovered in my collages, one that employs juxtaposing hard-edged solid shapes against soft painterly marks.


Lost with Possessions

Oil and Acrylic on Canvas

IMG_7609

IMG_8357

IMG_8354

IMG_8355

IMG_8352

IMG_8353

IMG_8356


Previous
Next

Waiting Room of the Forest

Oil and acrylic on canvas

IMG_8340

IMG_8342

IMG_8343

IMG_8344

IMG_8345

IMG_8346

IMG_8347

IMG_8348

IMG_8349

IMG_8350


Previous
Next

Ritual Abhorrence

Oil on canvas
80x80cm

IMG_3344

IMG_3343

IMG_3342

IMG_3340

IMG_3339

IMG_3244


Previous
Next

A painting made from a collage on paper that aimed to comment on issues of the sexualisation of youth that exists in the historical art, in popular culture and in the minds of powerful men and how this mental attitude leads to real and violent attacks and abuse. The imagery in the original collage was taken from a lot of historical painting and sculpture that displayed sexualised nudes with very childlike faces and juxtaposes them with paintings of landscapes and still life’s of bountiful harvests that so often represent fertility and patriarchal wealth. Real police tape found at the remains of a crime scene in my neighbourhood was pasted onto the collage to hint at the justice system’s presence in this issue, something that came about after thinking about the ineffectuality in stopping an issue that begins in the mind with prosecution of individuals once the devastation has already occured.


Incision

Oil on canvas
80x80cm

IMG_3345

IMG_3346

IMG_3347

IMG_3348

IMG_3349

IMG_3350

IMG_3351


Previous
Next

Another oil painting from a collage on paper made prior. This piece tries to draw relations between seemingly disparate topics via juxtaposition. The piece is open to individual subjective interpretation but one can’t fail to notice the bodily themes of the images. Some of the things I was thinking about when painting this piece was the idea of the passing of objects in and out of the human body, whether that’s something as violent as the invasion of a parasitic worm or as necessary as the medical intervention of an iron lung or life-saving surgery. The piece gets its name from the nuance of the act of breaking the skin, whether it’s controlled and humanistic like a surgical incision or as wild and animalistic as a creater killing for food.


False Memory

Oil on canvas
78x89cm


Source Misattribution

Oil on canvas
95x95cm


Discourse Collision

Oil on canvas
95x95cm


The Monochrome Series

Acrylic and solvent ink on canvas

20171128_202707

Joined at the Head

The Role of the Woman

The Mind Without Borders

Too Many Doctors

View from Double Decker

Tim Allen's Painting Rack

Waxwork Infirmary


Previous
Next

Muddled Parley

Oil on canvas
40x50cm